Shinonsen Town, Hyogo

Every time going through the tunnel the beautiful cove appearsand a cheer arises “Wow, it’s beautiful!” Such scenes appear repeatedly in the Tajima region’s land route (the San’in Coast Geopark, certified by UNESCO) along the coast of the Sea of Japan. Moroyose, Shin-onsencho has a naturally good port that extends from the narrow entrance inward, and has prospered as a port for Kitamae-bune since the Edo period. There were influential shipowners, such as the Nakafujita family (Aboshiya), the Higashifujita family, the Michimori family (Chiharaya), and others. The local culture was also invigorated due to the exchange of people and goods by Kitamae-bune. The Moroyose area produced many cultural figures, such as poet of the Meiji period Maeda Sumitaka, Japanese-style painter Hisaharu Tanikado and more.

  • 風待ち・潮待ち港

Cultural Properties of Shin-onsencho

  • Hiyoriyama

    The place where the sailors of Kitamae-bune forecast the weather before departing. Some of the all-night lights still exist today.

  • Iyonaga Shrine

    The shrine where the boatmen of Kitamae-bune used to pray for maritime safety. There are Tamagaki hedges and lanterns that shipowners across the country donated.

  • Ryumanji Temple, Mt.Shokokusan

    A temple dedicated to the souls of the crew of Kitamae-bune which were shipwrecked off Moroyose Port.

  • A main house of the Higashifujita Family

    A residence of the Higashifujita family, a small-cargo vessel wholesaler that made their wealth through Kitamae-bune.

  • A main house of the Nakafujita Family

    A residence of the Nakafujita family, a small-cargo vessel wholesaler that made their wealth through Kitamae-bune.

  • A main house of the Michimori Family

    A residence of the Michimori family, a small-cargo vessel wholesaler that made their wealth through Kitamae-bune

  • Trace of a mooring pile used by Kitamae-bune

    Trace of a mooring pile used by Kitamae-bune to enter and leave the port safely

  • Iyonaga Shrine's annual festival

    This is a festival that originated from the Kyoto Gion Festival, financially supported by the small-cargo vessel wholesalers who made their wealth through Kitamae-bune and passed down to this day.

  • Funa-ema of Iyonaga Shrine

    Funa-ema which Kitamae-bune shipowners and sailors dedicated prayers to for the safety of the voyages.

  • Kitamae-bune's route map

    A route map which has been handed down for generations by the Hiura family who were Kitamae-bune boatsmen

  • A frame piece of the ship's name

    A frame with the ship's name and celebratory words put on Kitamae-bune of the Ishizuka Family, who was a small-cargo vessel wholesaler.